Appalachian National Scenic Trail

The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, also known as the Appalachian Trail, or the “AT,” courses through West Virginia (WV) twice on its 2,200-mile route through the Appalachian Mountains. The West Virginia segments are located in widely disparate areas in the southern state and in its eastern panhandle, more than 250 miles apart.

Appalachian Trail: Harpers Ferry

A 24-mile segment of the Appalachian Trail follows the crest of the Blue Ridge and crosses the Potomac River and Shenandoah River at Harpers Ferry, WV. Harpers Ferry is considered the quintessential mid-point on the trail, though not the exact mid-point. Many hikers use trailheads at Harpers Ferry as access for day hiking, and through-hikers use it as a rendezvous with friends and family. The trail at Harpers Ferry courses through the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park and the central segment of the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park. The headquarters of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy are located at Harpers Ferry. Because the headquarters is located roughly at the halfway point for the trail, many hikers customarily have photographs taken at Harpers Ferry.

Regional Information: Eastern Panhandle Region

Appalachian Trail: Peterstown

A 10-mile segment of the Appalachian Trail follows the crest of Peters Mountain and crosses the New River near Peterstown, WV. As a result of its relatively rural location, the Peterstown segment is not as popular with day hikers as is the Harpers Ferry segment, but its traffic has increased in recent decades. The Allegheny Trail joins the Appalachian Trail atop Peters Mountain, which is also the boundary for the Washington & Jefferson National Forests.

Regional Information: Greenbrier Valley Region

External Links:
Appalachian Trail Conservancy

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